The Paralyzing Nature of Fear and What To Do About It

18by Aisha Taylor

Two topics that keep coming up recently: (1) if you want something different, you need to do something different; and (2) fear. One day, my pastor talked about the power of fear: how it makes people comfortable and encourages people to be “masters at mediocrity.” People are so scared to fail that they give up before trying. Logically that seems like a waste of talent, but you would be surprised that there are so many people who refuse to leave their comfort zone. They do this knowing that there is something greater or that what they are doing now doesn’t work.

I often talk to people about their vision for their finances. Many of those recognize that they aren’t where they want to be, yet they refuse to do something differently. They take that hard look in the mirror, recognize the issue, but fear paralyzes them from taking the necessary steps to drive real change in their lives. It’s hard to witness at times. How can someone know something isn’t right, yet feel too powerless to change or refuse to change?

If you recognize and admit that something is wrong and really believe that something needs to change then commit to making the necessary change. I believe that thoughts are powerful. I visualize being debt-free. I think about what I would do with the extra money. Visualization helps to keep me focused on my goals, because it is easier to stay on track when I can live and breathe my “why”.

Recently I decided against going to an event. I wanted to go because I knew that it would be fun, the money that I spent would go to a good cause, and it would have been great to hang out with my friends. However, I knew that I would end up buying a dress and still have to buy a ticket, and I couldn’t afford it. Even though I knew that I couldn’t afford it, I still wanted to go. My ability to visualize my goal of being debt-free helped me to make the right decision. I stayed home, the event went on, and I’m sure it was successful.

There was a time when I felt that I needed to be everywhere, because I was scared that I would miss something or would disappoint someone. It was very expensive, because, of course, I would buy a new dress for each event. I didn’t realize that those things were going on with or without me and that very few people would remember what I wore to the event. Therefore, why continue to spend money on those new clothes to wear once? It’s ok to say “no.” I learned to say “no,” because I am the person who has to live with my actions.

Fear can manifest itself in many ways that can result in poor financial decisions. My inability to say “no” caused me to spend way more money than I should have. Other people may limit themselves financially because they are scared to start a business or adhere to a budget because they might fail. Some even are scared to contribute to a retirement plan because they are scared to miss out now.

Don’t be scared to step out of your comfort zone. Ask yourself, “What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?” Whatever that is, do it. Don’t be afraid.

Aisha Taylor is a #1 Amazon Best Selling Author of the book “5+5 FNPhenomenal Ways to Save $100 This Week Without Killing Your Lifestyle”, and the Founder of FNPhenomenal (Frugal –n- Phenomenal). FNPhenomenal helps women to break the vicious cycle of making money, but not keeping it. FNPhenomenal provides education about money management, empowers women to take control of their lives, develop a healthier relationship with money, and pursue being phenomenal.

Visit Aisha online at www.FNPhenomenal.com
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